The day before David Warner tore New Zealand apart at the MCG, his first cricket coach died.

Australian cricket star David Warner has paid tribute to the coach who encouraged him to briefly bat right-handed as a teenager.

Warner wore a black armband as he tore the New Zealand attack apart in Friday night's big one-day international win at the MCG.

Laurie Heil, Warner's first coach, died the previous day.

"He was the man who changed me from left-hand to right-hand," Warner said.

"It was obviously unfortunate, what happened, but my thoughts and prayers are with the family."

Warner said Heil coached him from the age of eight until he was 16 or 17.

When Warner was 13, he played around with right-handed batting and Heil noted he hit the ball in the air less.

So he encouraged Warner to bat right-handed for a season, until he switched back.

Warner was named player of the match and man of the series after Friday night's win, which completed a 3-0 sweep of New Zealand.

If Warner had not been run out on the last ball of the innings, he would have become only the 11th player to carry his bat through a one-day international.

He mauled the New Zealand attack for 156, his fourth-highest ODI score.

After Australia slumped to 4-73, Warner mastered the conditions and single-handedly took the game away from the Black Caps.

"I wouldn't say I put a few shots away - I could only play with what they delivered at me," he said.

"Look, like everyone, I think the wicket was quite challenging.

"It was a bit different to what we're used to here at the MCG - it looked like an absolute belter, but it was quite two-paced.

"Once the ball was a bit older, it was actually hard to use the pace.

"You had to really hit the ball into the gaps ... you had to construct your innings and give yourself time at the end."

Warner marked his century with an unusual celebration, where he raised one arm in the air and used his bat handle as if it was a microphone.

He explained it is a nod to teammates, who had changed his nickname from Bull to the more-measured Reverend.

By Roger Vaughan, AAP

Sportsta Contributor

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